bilingual baby names
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Choosing a child's name is never easy, but choosing a bilingual baby's name is WAY harder. Not only is there already enough pressure in figuring out a name that suits your style as well as something that's original and not overly used. You also have to worry about how a name can be possibly mangled in English or in Spanish because some names just don't translate well to both languages. When choosing a baby's name, you have to keep in mind your side of the family that perhaps doesn't speak English.

Those relatives would be quick to butcher your child's name if you choose something complicated or a name that only sounds pretty in English. Like Savannah, for example, it sounds lovely in English, but you don't want your Spanish-speaking relatives laughing every time they call your baby Sábana and wonder why you named her after a bedsheet, right? 

More from MamásLatinas: 14 Unique baby names inspired by celebrity kids

These are things that only bilingual people have to think about and consider before making a decision as big as this one. Everyone will have an opinion, but finding something you and your partner are happy and comfortable is key. This is a major decision for anyone, whether you have a baby on the way or simply planning ahead for your future bundles of joy. Finding that one special name that your child will love for their whole life that fits in with the American culture but also doesn't leave out your culture can be tricky. 

Not to worry, we've gathered some gorgeous bilingual baby names for you so you don't have to look any further. Some sound exactly the same in both languages and the ones that don't are still lovely even with the slight differences in pronunciation that an English-dominant or Spanish-dominant speaker might give them. Check 'em out. 

Aldo 1

I mean just try to say this name wrong, it's not really possible to. Even if you pronounce it as wonky as possible, it still sounds good. 

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Alma 2

Alma

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Soulful en español or in English. 

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Ana 3

Ana

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Whether you go with Ana, Anna or Anita all signs point to lovely. 

Andrea 4

Andrea

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There are a couple of pronunciations of this in English, so you might have to correct some English speakers, but Spanish speakers will nail it every time. 

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Antonia/Antonio 5

Antonia/Antonio

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You could have a little Toña or Toñita. 

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Bianca 6

Bianca

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Bianca is like the Italian version of Blanca. Blanca works too. 

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Bruno 7

Bruno

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This name is totally 24 karat gold. 

Camila/Camilo 8

Camila/Camilo

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So lovely for a girl or a boy. 

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Carla/Carlos 9

Carla/Carlos

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You could add Carlo to this bunch as well. 

David 10

David

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There's a reason this name never goes out of style. 

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Elena 11

Elena

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You don't even have to be from Avalor to love this name. 

Elsa 12

Elsa

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It's short, sweet and perfect for bilingual families. 

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Emilia/Emilio 13

Say them in English and then say them in Spanish, pretty much identical, right? 

Eva 14

Eva

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You can't go wrong with this classic. 

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Francisco 15

Francisco

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Not gonna lie, it sounds better when pronounced in Spanish, but it's not too shabby in English. 

Gabriel/Gabriela 16

Gabriel/Gabriela

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Angelic in both languages. 

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Gloria 17

Gloria

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It's perfect for a glorious child. 

Isabela 18

Isabela

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This name means my god is bountiful. Big meaning for a beautiful name. 

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Leo 19

Leo

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So simple and yet so commanding. 

Liliana 20

Whether you say this name in English or in Spanish, it has a lovely lilting sound to it. 

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Lola 21

Lola

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As Sara Vaughan sang, "Whatever Lola wants, Lola gets." 

Lucas 22

It's another form of Luke, but way easier to pronounce in Spanish. 

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Luis/Luisa 23

Luis/Luisa

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The feminine version of this name doesn't get enough play in our opinion. 

Marcos 24

Marcos

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You can also drop the S and go with Marco. 

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Maria/Mario 25

Maria/Mario

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You know we couldn't leave these off the list. 

Mateo 26

Mateo

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So much better than Matthew for Spanish speakers. 

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Miguel 27

Miguel

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This name plays well with others. Think Luis Miguel or Miguel Angel. 

Monica 28

Monica

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This is an ancient name that somehow remains fresh. 

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Olivia 29

Scandal fans will appreciate this one. 

Paloma 30

Paloma

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In Spanish it means dove, in English it simply sounds lovely. 

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Paula/Paulo 31

Easy for abuela to pronounce and won't be garbled by a non-Spanish speaking teacher on the first day of school. 

Rafael/Rafaela 32

Rafael/Rafaela

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Of Biblical origins and particularly popular in Mexico and Spain. 

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Salvador 33

Salvador

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People in English will try to shorten it to Sal, but that won't happen with Spanish speakers. 

Samuel 34

Samuel

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This is a universally beloved name. 

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Sebastian 35

The pronunciation is decidedly different depending on whether you say it in Spanish or English, but both sound elegant and sophisticated. 

Sergio 36

Sergio

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You can say it with a hard G in English or a soft G in Spanish without it losing its charm. 

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Sofia 37

Sofia

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No "ph" for a Sofia who is bilingual. You have to go with the F. 

Veronica 38

Veronica

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Even shortened to Vero this name sounds good. 

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Victor/Victoria 39

Victor/Victoria

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To the victor go the spoils or to the Victoria. 

Zara 40

You'll hear it pronounced with a harder Z in English and more of an S sound in Spanish. Both will be music to your ears.