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I've said it before and I will say it many times more: Choosing a baby's name is an awesome responsibility and not one to be taken lightly.  I suggest that you figure out what is important to you, take your time and go with your gut. For example, I know that for many Latinos choosing a bilingual baby name is HUGELY important. The task is daunting, but fortunately there are lots of great options.

More from MamásLatinas: 30 Beautiful baby names inspired by Spanish words

Many will tell you a name is not truly bilingual if the pronunciation varies from English to Spanish or vice versa. I disagree. To me a bilingual name is bilingual if it works and sounds good in both languages. Why? Well, to begin with there are very few names that are going to sound exactly the same way in both languages and also having grown up as a bicultural child, I know firsthand the beauty of hearing your name pronounced in two languages.

Click through this gallery of great bilingual names for both boys and girls and go ahead and say them out loud in Spanish and English so you get a sense of how well they work in ambos languages.

 

Ana 1

Ana

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It's a classic name that will never go out of style and comes easily off the tongue in both English and Spanish.

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Andrea 2

Andrea

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I particularly like the way this name sounds when pronounced in Spanish, but if someone were to say it with an English pronunciation it sounds great too.

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Bianca 3

Bianca

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This name is awesome because it really does sound exactly the same in English and Spanish.

Eva 4

Eva

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Another classic name that will never go out of style because of its simplicity and beauty.

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Isabela 5

Isabela

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What a gorgeous name, no?

Liliana 6

Liliana

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This is a good and familiar name, which somehow isn't all that common.

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Maria 7

Maria

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I just couldn't stay away from this name. It works in both languages so well!

Olivia 8

Olivia

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This name is wonderful. It's a great name for a girl with a bilingual family. Think about it ... Olivia, no llores...Olivia, don't cry... See, it works! Plus I might be a big fan of Olivia Pope.

 

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Paloma 9

Paloma

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I know a little girl named Paloma and saying her name is like uttering a mini-poem every time.

Sofia 10

Sofia

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Again, with this name I favored the spelling that works the best in Spanish. This name is a HUGE favorite and has been topping the most popular babies names lists for years.

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Abraham 11

Abraham

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I LOVE this name, it's got some substance to it in both languages.

Aldo 12

Aldo

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Totally not based on anything other than my opinion, but don't you think a baby named Aldo could grow up to be an international business person?

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Carlos 13

Carlos

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Carlos is one of those names that I always love. It's classic without being tiresome.

David 14

David

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This name I can't actually decide on whether I like it better pronounced in English or Spanish because it sounds wonderful in both.

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Diego 15

Diego

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This is a great name for a boy and sounds pretty much identical in both languages.

Francisco 16

Francisco

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Total disclosure: I love this name for various reasons including that it is my brother's name and that I live in San Francisco.

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Gabriel 17

Gabriel

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It's kind of an epic name. It has a whole Biblical aspect to it, but it also is a good solid name even without that angel association.

Mateo 18

Mateo

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Oh my gosh, I am adoring all of these bilingual boys' names. Mateo is a winner!

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Sebastian 19

Sebastian

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This is what my mom was going to name me if I was a boy, but I'm not. Still a good name though.

Sergio 20

Sergio

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This is my cousin's name and I will admit that the sound of the "g" changes quite a bit from Spanish to English, but fortunately it sounds great either way.