The storyline behind the catchy ranchera "Muchacho de Campo" by Voz de Mando reminds me of the typical novelas that I used to watch when I was young. The usual plot consisted of the rich guy falling for the muchacha who worked as a maid or who came from a poor farming family.

This is the one aspect of my Latin culture that still shocks me! Perhaps classism is not as prevalent here in the U.S. because there is less of a gap between the haves and have-nots. Although I've been in Mexico just a few times I feel like classism is even more pronounced there. I could tell by the way the ricos treated people in service and transportation. Although my family was highly educated and came from the upper middle class from Chile, we were brought up differently.

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We moved to the U.S. when I was 11 years old but my parents would send me back to Chile every summer. As a teen and young adult, I dated Chileans who came from money, even the muchacho de campo who was my favorite because of his humility came from wealth. Except for him, all of the other boys treated me differently because I was a woman. Their family name and their parents' wealth closely defined them.

My gringo came from a family of Irish immigrants, blue-collar workers. I fell in love with him because he was beautiful inside and out; he was a hard worker. He often tells our kids, "I started working as a golf caddy when I was twelve and worked hard for my money!"

He has always treated me as an equal and has been a pillar of support throughout my career. Most importantly, he is an amazing father and a hard worker. My husband manages a bank branch close to our home. He is my muchacho de campo and has made me happy for 26 years!

My family was always supportive but I can't say the same about my friends. Ironically it was a Gringa friend that I met in college who came from wealth who told me, "I can't believe you would marry into a family that's so different from yours!" Needless to say, she is no longer my friend.

Image via Thinkstock

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About the author
Lucia, Co-founder and EVP of MamásLatinas, has led Hispanic media brands such as Univision's Galavision, MTV tr3s and People en Español. When Lucia is not traveling for work or in her office in NYC, she's at home with her husband and two children in New Rochelle, New York. 

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