The Zika virus is spreading in Miami & it's scarier than you could ever imagine

If you thought the Zika outbreak was over, think again. There are now 14 cases of the Zika infections in two Florida counties and the CDC has confirmed that local mosquitoes are most likely responsible. As a result, the CDC is now advising that pregnant women not travel to these areas. Seriously, this is getting crazy. 

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Zika is officially here in the U.S. and it's spreading in parts of South Florida, specifically in Wynwood, Miami, the CDC confirmed. They believe that it's been spread by mosquitoes and have therefore released a warning to pregnant women and their partners.

If you're a pregnant woman who actually lives in the area or travels there frequently, guidelines have been suggested in order to prevent mosquito bites such as using EPA-registered insect repellents that have been proven safe and effective for pregnant and breastfeeding women.

They also recommend wearing protective, permethrin-treated clothing and gear, using screens on windows and doors, repairing any holes in screens, using air conditioner when possible, as well as throwing out items that hold water. Condoms are also being suggested whenever having sex.  And if you do live or frequently travel to this part of Miami and are pregnant, the CDC is recommending you get tested in both your first and second trimester of pregnancy.

As for pregnant women who don't live or travel to Wynwood, the CDC recommends not traveling there at all unless absolutely necessary.

This is scary stuff, especially since this is the first time the CDC has put any warning out there against traveling to any area in the U.S. due to Zika. What's frightening is that Zika has been linked to microcephaly, a condition that results in underdeveloped brains and unusually small heads in babies born to mothers infected with the virus. The CDC has also found links with the Zika virus and Guillan-Barre syndrome, a condition that affects the nervous system and can result in paralysis in adults.

The good news is that the Florida Department of Health is trying to find ways to combat the virus. They plan to start aerial spraying insecticides in efforts to kill mosquitoes in the area. Let's cross our fingers they're able get a handle on this. 

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