pregnancy Conceiving a rainbow baby, a term used for a pregnancy after a miscarriage, may be a bit easier now. A study, published in Obstetrics & Gynecology, sheds new light on how long couples should delay getting pregnant after a miscarriage. The statistics are hopeful! Get the details and learn all of the facts. 

Read more in ¿Qué más?: 14 Things you didn't know were bad for you while pregnant

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The waiting game 1

The waiting game

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While most women are recommended to wait three months before trying to get pregnant again, a new study shows that the waiting game may be unnecessary. Almost 1,000 cases of miscarriages (before the 20 weeks) were studied. Researchers assessed the women for six months after their loss for the short trial and four years for the long trial. Fifty three percent of women who got pregnant before the recommended time ended up having successful births--compared to 36% who waited the three months. 

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Statistics are in your favor 2

Statistics are in your favor

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According to American Pregnancy Association, at least 85% of women who have had one loss will go on to have a healthy pregnancy the next time around. The same goes for 75% of those who have experienced two or three losses.

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Your experience may be bittersweet 3

Your experience may be bittersweet

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Once pregnant, you may experience feelings of loss associated with your previous miscarriage(s). Grieving while also celebrating your pregnancy is expected and normal. Reach out for support from loved ones or speak to therapist to help cope with your emotions.  

Emotional recovery 4

Emotional recovery

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Being psychologically healed and ready to try to conceive again is a subjective journey. "Emotional compared with physical readiness may require individual couple assessment," wrote the study's authors. 

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Keep taking prenatal vitamins 5

Keep taking prenatal vitamins

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Research has found that expecting moms with a low level of folic acid have a higher chance at miscarriage. Taking prenatal vitamins can reduce those chances and lower the risk of giving birth to a baby with chromosomal defects

Get testing done 6

Get testing done

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According to the Miscarriage Association, there are five main causes for a miscarriage. They include genetics, hormonal, infection, blood clotting or anatomical. Ask your doctor to run tests to determine what could have caused the loss. 

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Stay active 7

Stay active

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The American Pregnancy Association advises that being active for 30 minutes everyday can benefit a mom-to-be's health. The same goes for women who're trying to get pregnant after a miscarriage. Talk to your doctor before starting a new workout routine. 

Don't give up on intimacy 8

Don't give up on intimacy

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According to New Kids Center, having sex three to four times a week will cover your most fertile moments. Ovulation occurs on the 14th day of your cycle, which increases chances of pregnancy.