grow your own foodYou guys, I am a total city girl, always have been, always will be, but I'm starting to get more in touch with my earthy nature girl side. It's about time considering  my abuela raised her children on a rancho and knew a thing or two hundred about living off the land and I married a man who is passionate about horticulture. Now, before you get the idea that I've moved off into nowheresville and am planning on living only off of what I can grow myself, that's not what is going on at all. I'm still in the city, but I've discovered that growing some of my own food is quite easy and satisfying. Guess what? You can totally do it too even if you don't have much space, I promise.

Read more¿Qué más?:Try these easy tostones stuffed with mango ceviche (RECIPE)

Check out these six food plants you can grow from kitchen scraps and go on and get scrappy!

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Potatoes 1

Potatoes

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You see these gorgeous papas? They were grown in a perforated garbage can filled with soil in our backyard. You basically take small potatoes or cut up potatoes that have a least two eyes and stick them in soil to make new potatoes that taste better than anything you can get at the store.

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Green onions 2

Green onions

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This is the first thing my hubby ever showed me how to grow. If you have a potted version of green onions, you can cut from the top and then let them grow back indefinitely. Otherwise, you can put the roots of the green onions in a glass of water and let them regrow. So easy!

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Onions 3

Onions

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Regular onions are only a little bit harder to grow than green onions as evidenced by the fact that they seem to want to grow all by themselves if you don't use them fast enough. You simply cut off the root end leaving about an inch of the actual onion and plant that baby root down in soil. Don't forget to water.

Garlic 4

Garlic

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I think garlic is edible gold. You can grow your own garlic from leftover garlic cloves put in soil and placed where the sun shines.

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Celery 5

Celery

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Did you know that if you stick the bottom of a celery stack in water, chances are it will begin to regrow? After three days you can stick it in soil to keep it growing. FYI, the celery you put in your bloody mary won't grow, so you may as well eat it.

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Basil & mint 6

Basil & mint

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Regrowing basil or mint is as easy as taking a cutting and putting it in water until it roots and then putting it in soil.