It seems as if every week there's a new makeup challenge trending on Instagram or YouTube. We've seen it all from 100 layers of makeup to the full face using only highlighters. But Canadian self-taught makeup artist Yasaman Gheidi's #InsideoutChallenge takes on a much bigger meaning by addressing the stigma surrounding mental illnesses. Participants were asked to use makeup to create an outward design that expresses how they actually feel on the inside, and it's the most inspiring and powerful thing you'll ever see.

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Image via lilmoonchildd/Instagram, lenhartsville/Instagram, and michellefrit/Instagram

How it all began. 1

How it all began.

Image via lilmoonchildd/Instagram

Yasaman Ghedidi is the self-taught Vancouver-based makeup artist that started the challenge after posting this photo to Instagram. In her caption, she wrote about suffering an anxiety attack and how she decided to turn it into shedding light on mental health illness and its stigma through the challenge.

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Dealing with depression. 2

Dealing with depression.

Image via bat.barbie/Instagram

I Inherited depression and anxiety disorders from my mom, who inspires me constantly to keep moving forward. I know there will always be road blocks, but I’m actually really happy by how much understanding there is on social media now about anxiety/depression. It doesn’t have to be a dark mystery! The more the social stigma lifts, the better.” - @bat.barbie 

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Having an anxiety attack. 3

Having an anxiety attack.

Image via lenhartsville/Instagram

I know I’m about to have an anxiety attack or another hit of depression when I feel this cool shot of electric blue in my chest. That’s the only way to describe it. It’s ice and fear and sends chills through me. Obsessive worrying trickles down from my head to my heart, and everything is cold. Still. Anxiety freezes me. I seem to become more colorful and expressive and positive, but that’s all for your sake. Everything inside is strange, miscolored melting ice. Filling my heart with fears.” - @lenshartsville 

Borderline personality disorder. 4

Borderline personality disorder.

Image via foxys_fxs/Instagram

I’ve suffered with this since I can remember, the noise and emotions consumes you and on the inside it’s a battle with your own mind but you just look bright and smiley and people never notice,” - @foxys_fxs 

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No diagnosis yet. 5

No diagnosis yet.

Image via weathersrabbits/Instagram

I chose something a touch different than the others in this challenge based on my overall lifelong emotions. Robotic, doll like, a touch of clown. Cold unfeeling and not able to understand. Perhaps a little frightening. I am still going through a process of being diagnosed so I can’t declare who I am hence the slight alien look.” - @weathersrabbits 

Anxiety, depression & eating disorders. 6

Anxiety, depression & eating disorders.

Image via jesmarez/Instagram

“I recently starting seeing a counselor because of anxiety and depression! Woah depression! What? But that doesn’t make sense! You’re right, sometimes mental illness doesn’t always make sense just as when someone gets the flu it doesn’t make sense! So here is what I feel like, I also incorporated a few marks from my eating disorder (which I sometimes still struggle with but that’s okay! Life is about growing!)” - @jesmarez

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The PTSD struggle. 7

The PTSD struggle.

Image via noellerenteria/Instagram

I have PTSD, depression, anxiety (GAD), panic disorder, and social phobia. It feels like you’re constantly drowning, but never dying. So you’re always suffering and in fear. One thing that keeps me going is remembering that we can’t control the wind, but we can direct the sail.” - @noellerenteria 

Adjustment disorder. 8

Adjustment disorder.

Image via michellefrit/Instagram 

Dealing with the pressure to be perfect strips away parts of our personal identities. Before I sought out help, I had been struggling with anxiety and depression for months on my own. I was afraid of my problems becoming real, and I was afraid of the strong face I showed my family and friends becoming tarnished.” - @michellefrit